COLLECTIVE INFORMATION ABOUT COVID-19

About your antibody test result

Om ditt provsvar - antikroppstest - engelskaThe content concerns Västra Götaland

An antibody test, also known as a serological test, is a blood test used to detect antiviral antibodies. The coronavirus that causes the Covid-19 disease is named SARS-CoV-2.

The tests used to detect antibodies to SARS-CoV-2 meet the efficacy guidelines issued by the Public Health Agency in Guidelines for Antibody Detection.

Regardless of your test result, it is important to continue following official advice to protect yourself and others against Covid-19.

Positive test result

A positive test result means you have developed antibodies to SARS-CoV-2. This means you have had Covid-19 or have been vaccinated.

According to the Public Health Agency, if you have developed antibodies you are probably protected for up to six months from the time of infection.

The presence of antibodies in your blood reduces the risk of you becoming infected and passing the infection on to others. It also means you have more opportunity to meet people. This could in the first instance mean socialising with close relatives, both indoors and outdoors.

Even if the result is positive, each person must always make their own assessment based on their individual circumstances. It is also important that you continue to follow official recommendations to reduce the spread of infection in the community.

Further information about antibodies is available on the Public Health Agency website.

Negative test result

A negative test result means you lack measurable levels of antibodies to SARS-CoV-2 in your blood. This suggests that you have not had Covid-19. It could also be because you have taken the test too early (less than three weeks after the onset of symptoms) or because of the length of time (several months) the antibodies have disappeared.

Continue to follow official recommendations to reduce the spread of infection in the community.

Inconclusive test result

An inconclusive test result means that it is not possible to assess whether you have antibodies to SARS-CoV-2. It could be that the test was taken too early (less than four weeks after the onset of symptoms) or there was something in the sample that spoiled the analysis. If it is suspected that the test had been taken too early, taking a new test after three weeks could be an option. If this test also produces an inconclusive result, no new test is required. The assessment in that case is that antibodies have not been definitely detected, which suggests that you have not had Covid-19.

Continue to follow official recommendations to reduce the spread of infection in the community.

Analysis not carried out

If the sample was not analysed for technical reasons, you can make a new appointment for a test free of charge. Bring your test result with you the next time you are tested and show it to a member of staff. Continue to follow official recommendations to reduce the spread of infection in the community.

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